California Health Maps is an interactive mapping tool of health data for 578 census tract aggregation zones in California. You can map cancer incidence for 12 of the most common invasive cancer sites and filter by sex and race/ethnicity. Visit Learn to review methodology, data sources, and more.

Cancer Incidence

Cancer Statistics Zone Statewide
Cases
Age Adjusted Incidence Rate
(95% LCI, 95% UCI)


Age Adjusted Incidence Rate
All Cancer Sites - California

According to California Department of Public Health guidelines, cancer incidence rates cannot be reported if based on <15 cancer cases and/or a population of <10,000 to ensure confidentiality and stable statistical rates.

California
Demographics
Population
% Non-Hispanic White
% Non-Hispanic Black
% Hispanic
% Asian/Pacific Islander
% Foreign-Born
% Rural
Socioeconomic Status

Healthcare Access and Use
% Uninsured
% Routine Checkups
% Delayed Care
% Colorectal Cancer Screening
% Mammograms
% Pap Smears
% Preventive Care (Men, 65+ years)
% Preventive Care (Women, 65+ years)

Health and Well-Being
% Adult Obesity
% Food Insecure
% Physical Activity
% Smoking



Data Sources


Learn

The California Health Maps project aims to provide data for geographies beyond county-level statistics to better serve cancer control, public health, and policy efforts.

California Health Maps allows users to interactively map health data for California at a geographic level called zones, which are aggregates of census tracts. We have used a data-driven approach to define 578 zones for California, based on similar characteristics (poverty, urbanicity, racial/ethnic minority composition) and a minimum of 50,000 residents. These areas are generally smaller than county, but larger than census tract. Zones vary in population size from 51,229 to 98,764 with the number of census tracts ranging from 5 to 25.

California Health Maps include 5-year cancer incidence rates based on the most current data for 12 of the most common invasive cancer sites by sex and race/ethnicity (non-Hispanic White, non-Hispanic Black, Hispanic, and non-Hispanic Asian/Pacific Islander). It also includes selected population sociodemographic data based on 2010 Census and 2008-2012 American Community Survey data, and health and well-being, and health care access and use data from 500 Cities/CDC BRFSS and the 2015-2016 California Health Interview Survey.

Project Team

Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry (University of California, San Francisco)
Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program (University of Southern California)
National Cancer Institute
Westat, Inc.
California Health Interview Survey

Funding

California Department of Public Health
National Cancer Institute
University of California, Davis, Comprehensive Cancer Center

On this website, data are shown by cancer reporting zone. These zones have been designed so that they have a minimum population, have similar demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, and are geographically compact (they minimize the distance between different parts of the zone). The minimum population for each zone is 50,000 people.

Incidence rates for California statewide data are taken from the National Cancer Institute’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program using National Center for Health Statistics annual population estimates. Incidence rates for zones are calculated using data from the California Cancer Registry using 2010 Census population estimates and SEER 2015 census tract estimates by race/origin (controlling to Vintage 2015).

Counties with larger populations (more than 100,000 people) were divided into multiple zones by combining adjacent census tracts. For the rest of the state, adjacent counties and parts of counties were combined to form zones. Three demographic and socioeconomic characteristics were used to determine similarity: the percent minority population (percent of the population who are not non-Hispanic White), percent of the population with incomes below poverty, and the proportion of the population living in urban and rural areas.

We used population data from Census 2010 and Census 2010 tract geographies to construct the zones. Poverty data came from the American Community Survey 2012-2016 5-year data. We used a software zone design program called AZTool to identify aggregations of adjacent tracts and counties that optimize the three objectives: a target population of 50,000, geographic compactness, and similarity in terms of minority population, poverty, and urbanicity characteristics.

Aggregation: Collections of smaller units grouped together for the purposes of statistical reporting. See Methodology for more information.

Age-Adjusted Incidence Rate (AAIR): Age-adjustment is a statistical method that allows comparisons of incidence rates to be made between populations with different age distributions. This is important since the incidence of most cancers increases with age. An age-adjusted cancer incidence (or death) rate is defined as the number of new cancers (or deaths) per 100,000 population that would occur in a certain period of time if that population had a ‘standard’ age distribution. In the California Health Maps, incidence rates are age-adjusted using the U.S. 2000 Standard Population.

Breast Cancer Screening: Percent of women aged 50-74 years who have received a mammogram in the past 2 years.
Source: 500 Cities/Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2018.

Cervical Cancer Screening: Percent of women aged 21–65 years who have not received a hysterectomy and have received a Papanicolaou (Pap) smear within the previous 3 years.
Source: 500 Cities/Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2018.

Confidence Interval: A statistical measure of the precision of the observed incidence rate. The lower confidence interval (LCI) and upper confidence interval (UCI) provide a range within which the true rate is thought to be with 95% confidence. Rates based on larger numbers are subject to less variation.

Colorectal Cancer Screening: Percent of adults aged 50–75 years who have received a fecal occult blood test (FOBT) within the past year, a sigmoidoscopy within the past 5 years and a FOBT within the past 3 years, or a colonoscopy within the past 10 years.
Source: 500 Cities/Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2018.

Data Suppression: According to California Department of Public Health guidelines, cancer incidence rates cannot be reported if based on fewer than 15 cancer cases and/or 10,000 population counts. Incidence rates with fewer than 15 cases and/or 10,000 population-at-risk for a given cancer site/sex/racial or ethnic group are not shown to ensure confidentiality and stable statistical rates.

Delayed Care: Percent of adults who delayed or did not get medicine/medical services in the past year.
Source: California Health Interview Survey, 2015-2016.

Demographics: Statistical data relating to the population and particular groups within it.

Food Insecure: Percent of adults in low-income households (<200% of the Federal Poverty Line) that are hungry or at risk of hunger.
Source: California Health Interview Survey, 2015-2016.

Foreign Born: Percent of residents who were born outside the United States.
Source: American Community Survey, 2008-2012.

Incidence: The number of new cases of cancer diagnosed in 2012-2016 (5 years).

Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status: A composite measure of seven indicator variables created by principal component analysis; indicators include: education, blue collar job, unemployment, household income, poverty, rent, and house value. Quintiles based on state distribution, with quintile 1 being the lowest SES and 5 being the highest.
Source: American Community Survey, 2008-2012.

Over 65: Percent of residents age 65 years and older.
Source: American Community Survey, 2008-2012.

Adult Obesity: Percent of adults with a body mass index (kilograms/square meter) of 30 or greater.
Source: California Health Interview Survey, 2015-2016.

Physical Activity: Percent of adults that walked at least 150 minutes in the past week for either leisure or transportation.
Source: California Health Interview Survey, 2015-2016.

Race/Ethnicity: Race/ethnicity is categorized as: All races/ethnicities, Non-Hispanic (NH) White, NH Black, Asian/Pacific Islander, or Hispanic. "All races" includes all of the above, as well as other and unknown race/ethnicity and American Indian/Alaska Native. The latter two groups are not reported separately due to small numbers for many cancer sites.

Racial/Ethnic Composition: Distribution of residents’ race/ethnicity (e.g., % Hispanic, % non-Hispanic White, % non-Hispanic Black, % non-Hispanic Asian/Pacific Islander).
Source: US Census, 2010.

Rural: Percent of residents who reside in blocks that are designated as rural.
Source: American Community Survey, 2008-2012.

Sex: California Cancer Registry defines this field as the sex or gender of the cancer patient, and codes available are male, female, intersex, transsexual, and transgender (natal male, natal female, or not specified). However, categories beyond male and female are not consistently coded by medical reporting facilities, and population estimates for gender categories beyond male and female are not available. Thus, cancer incidence data are reported for only male and female sex at this time.

Smoking: Percent of adults who are current smokers.
Source: California Health Interview Survey, 2015-2016.

Uninsured: Percent of residents who did not have health insurance.
Source: American Community Survey, 2008-2012.

Preventive Care: Percent of men or women 65 years and older who have received all of the following: an influenza vaccination in the past year; a pneumococcal vaccination ever; either a fecal occult blood test (FOBT) within the past year, a sigmoidoscopy within the past 5 years and a FOBT within the past 3 years, or a colonoscopy within the previous 10 years; and (for women only) a mammogram in the past 2 years.
Source: 500 Cities/Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2018.

Routine Checkups: Percent of adults who report having been to a doctor for a routine checkup (e.g., a general physical exam, not an exam for a specific injury, illness, condition) in the previous year.
Source: 500 Cities/Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2018.